Comunity Security And Peace Program Project

Economic hardship which resulted from last year poor harvest and high prices of food commodities in the market still the first priority in the state which resulted in to Increase in the cases of  street children in the market, theft and robbery within and between the communities at night and days hour.

The state also experience improved cases of limited internet this month in the state particularly Torit county

The movements of people from the villages to Torit town footing day and night safely looking for food from other areas in the state gives hope for peace.

The Initiative taken by money-miji (s) (informal authorities) to conduct patrol along the main road connecting their villages to Torit town reduce cases of looting and killing outside Torit town and this gives hope for peace in Torit county.

The government of the state, religious leaders, civil society and general communities of Eastern Equatoria state were advocating for peace and reconciliation in the state.

Generally the state experiences reduced cases of looting and harassment of cars (public transport) along the main road connecting the state to other town this month.

PROGRESS TOWARDS OUTCOMES

OUTCOME 1

Selected communities and community action group members in South Sudan use their increased analysis, dialogue, and peace building skills to identify, prioritize, analyses, and resolve local- and state-level peace and security concerns engage in reconciliation processes and support newer groups. They do this independently and collaboratively through established mechanisms (e.g., CSWG’s, PCRCs, and peace committees).

OUTPUT 1.1

Community security assessments (CSAs) completed, analysed, and disseminated to local-level stakeholders, and used to inform community action plans, dialogues, debates, advocacy, and awareness-raising activities.

Activity 1.1.1&1.1.2:  Conduct Community Security Assessments (CSA) in programme locations 

Activity 1.1.3: Conduct annual mini perception surveys across project locations

OUTPUT 1.2

New community action groups formed in new and existing locations, and members drawn from various existing community action groups, trained to support the formation and development of new groups.

Activity 1.2.3: Coordinate exchange and learning visits within each state between existing and newly established community action groups

OUTPUT 1.3

Community action plans initiated by community action groups (established and new), that are conflict- and gender- sensitive, and support practical responses and proactive solutions to identified security and peace-building / reconciliation priorities.

Activity 1.3.1 Deliver training for the  community action groups, in community security/policing, conflict- and gender-sensitivity, crime prevention, conflict resolution and peacebuilding, tolerance-building, meeting coordination/facilitation, partnerships, networking, community engagement, and/or

SARRA facilitated training of Community Action Group (CAG) members including community water management committee on water management and conflict resolution including basic skills on water pump mechanic. The purpose of training or aims:

  • To increase the understanding of the basic principles of water management and conflict resolution including hand pump mechanics.
  • To improve communication and skills for managing boreholes and resolving conflicts around the water sources and within communities.
  • To learn about and practice conflict resolution processes, including mediation

This activity was to  address some of the key prioritized community  concerns based on community action plan; planning to address conflict along water sources (Boreholes) within the communities in Torit municipality by doing this we are targeting communities and community action group members in Torit municipality use their increased analysis, dialogue, and peace building skills to identify, priorities, analyses, and resolve local- and state  issues prioritized during CSWG meetings and the last CSA in Torit county Eastern Equatoria state, Torit.

CAG during the training and after were appreciating SARRA and Safer world for supporting each capacity building requested by community and they were able to gain knowledge on water management and conflict resolution particularly during the practical secession on hand pump mechanics and able to repair one hand pump

Total number of CAGs members trained during the reporting period
Actor Categories Male Female Total
Youth[1] Elderly Youth Elderly
Communities 17 9 6 4 36
Authorities 0 4 1 1 6
Civil Societies 2 1 0 0 3
External actors 0 0 0 0 0
Sub Total 19 14 7 5 45

Activity 1.3.2: Develop and implement community action plans by community action groups (including the seed fund-supported action plans) to address community concerns.

Action Plan 1:

Community Action Group (CAG) Name Munuki Block-A CSWGs
Action Plan Name Tension between Himodonge community and farmers group were resolved to let farmers resume farming system in the area Himodonge
Action Plan Type: Community or Seed Fund Community action plan
Description of the action plans. Word limit 150 (this is what will be used as a document summary for Karacel. (Please complete this at the end) SARRA Conducted peace and reconciliation dialogue between Torit municipality farmers group and Himodonge community (Monyomiji) including authorities. The peace dialogue aims to bring the two communities to understand their differences and comes up with possible solutions and recommendation.

This activity was to address one of the key prioritized community concerns based on community action plan; planning to address tension between  Torit municipality farmers group and Himodonge community (Monyomiji ). Issues prioritized during CAG meetings and the last CSA in Torit county Eastern Equatoria state, Torit.

Date the action plan started  2nd –November ,2016
Date the action plan completed  31st,march, 217
Issues prioritised in this action plan. ·          Insecurity and economic hardship

·          Cases of looting, theft/stealing along the main road and in the farms.

·          Illegal breaking of stones (quarry)

·          Poor coordination within and between farmers group and Himodonge community particularly local authority (Monye-miji).

·          Disafforestation ( unnecessary cutting of trees )

·          Ethnic tension within and between communities

Select a sensitivity level for the issue from the dropdown lists.   1 – Problem is widely discussed openly with all members of society and authorities
Steps taken by the community action groups to address issues. ·          Identify an issue and share it with the general community

·          Conduct consultation meeting with authorities

 

 

 

Notable change seen on implementation of the action plan ·          Reduced cases of harassment along the main roads

·          Reduce cases of heft and robbery

·          Community were resilience to their concerns

·          People were able to move to the garden

Level of involvement by women represented in the community action groups to implement this action plan. 30%
Level of involvement and contribution made by the formal and informal authorities and service provider’s in the implement this action plan. 50%

 

Action Plan 2:

 

OUTPUT 1.4

Community action groups take a lead in advocating and soliciting support and participation with/from authorities and service providers to resolve local issues, and are active in fostering processes to address ethnic and sectional divisions.

Activity 1.4.1a Facilitate monthly Community Security Working Groups (CSWGs and Peace Committees) meetings within and between communities and authorities

Generally Community Security Working Groups (CSWGs) meetings for this month (march , 2017) Was fine, community security Working Group (CSWG) was able to identified community security and peace concerns that affecting communities this included:

  • Economic hardship
  • Issues of theft, looting and robbery which resulted from economic hardship
  • Inadequate Agricultural input (tools and seeds)
  • Lack of coordination among security providers in the state
  • Continuing movement of people to the neighboring countries
  • Looting and harassment by security providers in the state
  • Inadequate basic services within the communities
  • Poor roads cause insecurity within the communities

CSWGs action points or recommendations for this month were cases of theft and robbery which was commonly prioritised in action plans by all the CSWGs, this includes:

  • Need for Agricultural input
  • Needs to report cases of theft and harassment to the authorities (security providers),
  • Need for dialogue within and between security providers
  • Need seed and agricultural tools.
  • Need for continuing awareness on community security/policing and wider community meetings to makes them aware of community security concerns generally. Other action point include: cleaning of poor roads that lead to insecurity in the community (Hawai meser) to reduce cases of theft and robbery,

The meetings was attended by 94 participants 53 males and 41 females this comprises of authorities who were included in our CSWG, community (youth, women, men elder religious leaders and others). Unregistered community members particularly women were interested for monthly CSWG meeting they were joining the meeting voluntary and raised community concerns with high expectation for SARRA and Saferworld to solve their economic hardship and other registered members were also reluctant to attend the monthly meeting due to domestic work.

This month our CSWG did not implement any action plan due to economic hardship and commitment to domestic work in except for Fodo-fodo CAG whom are participating in farmer’s group and Himodonge peace dialogue.

Total number of CSWGs/Peace Committees monthly meetings conducted by CAGs
Community Action Groups (CAGs) Planned Achievement Remark (explanations for under and over achievements)
Number %
Hawai meser (Ibalany) CSWG 1 1 100
Ilangi  CSWG 1 1 100
Fodo-fodo CSWG 1 1 100
Nyong CSWG 1 1 100
Sub Total 4  4 100  

Activity 1.4.1b Facilitate monthly Police-Community Relation Committee (PCRCs) meetings with communities and security providers

Total number of PCRCs monthly  meetings conducted by location
Community Action Groups (CAGs) Planned Achievement Remark (explanations for under and over achievements)
Number %
Ilangi PCRC
Sub Total        

Activity 1.4.1c Facilitate Communities-Authorities dialogues 

Activity 1.4.2 Conduct inter/ infra-communal dialogues or debates to address ethnic and sectional divisions (e.g., pastorals vs farmers, armed groups +vs government)

 

SARRA conducted inter-communal dialogue within Himodonge community and intra-communal dialogue between Himodonge and torit Municipal council farmers group. The purpose of the peace dialogue was to bring the two communities to understand their differences and comes up with possible solutions and recommendation

This activity was to address one of the key prioritized community concerns based on community action plan; planning to address tension between  Torit municipality farmers group and Himodonge community (Monyemiji ). Issues prioritized during CAG meetings and the last CSA in torit county Eastern Equatoria state, Torit

The major peace and security concerns the parties have and discussed were as mentions:

  • Insecurity and economic hardship
  • Cases of looting, theft/stealing along the main road and in the farms.
  • Harassment and killing
  • Illegal breaking of stones (quarry)
  • Poor coordination within and between farmers group and Himodonge community particularly local authority (Monye-miji).
  • Disafforestation ( unnecessary cutting of trees )
  • Ethnic tension within and between communities

The action points and recommendation made during the dialogue was as mention below:

  • Need for committee to be farm from the two parties
  • Need of join monitoring and evaluation of the forest
  • Farmers need to avoid unnecessary cutting of big fruitful trees
  • Need for proper coordination within and between Himodonge community and farmers group.
  • The committee form should register all the farmers cultivating in the area
  • Need to report those involving in the cases of theft, looting and harassment (criminal’s activities )

The participant from the two parties participant peacefully and were able to forgive each other and reconcile in the present of authorities. Himodonge community allowed farmers to continuing with the normal farming with consultations.

In the closing remarks authorities (county commissioner and Governor) appreciated the two parties of Himodonge and farmers group whom were come together to resolved their differences and the supporters for this peace dialogue to continuing creating peace among the people of Imotong state in his closing remarks Governor Imotong state said farmers has to start farming for us to fight the current economic crisis in south Sudan.

Activity 1.4.3 Facilitate awareness-raising campaigns on community security/policing and peace building issues, including where possible at least 1 radio campaign in each state (with a call-in/feedback facility)

Total number of people reached through the awareness-raising campaigns
Actor Categories Male Female Total
Youth[2] Elderly Youth Elderly
Communities  
Authorities  
Civil Societies  
External actors  
Sub Total          

OUTCOME 2

Formal and informal authorities and service providers, responsible for building peace and security and contributing to community resilience at the local- and state-levels, consult more with communities on peace and security issues, incorporate community concerns into their related responses, and operate to standards that are transparent, inclusive, and legitimate.

OUTPUT 2.1

Formal and informal authorities and service providers responsible for maintaining security and contributing to community resilience are working collaboratively with, and/or seeking advice from, communities and CSOs to address community concerns and implement actions to resolve issues.

Activity 2.1.1 Conduct an actor mapping in each state to identify formal and informal authorities and service providers and opportunities for collaboration

Activity 2.1.2 Deliver training for the representatives from formal and informal authorities, service providers, and institutions on any of the following: conflict- and gender-sensitivity, community security/policing, community resilience, and community engagement

Total number of authorities and service providers trained during the reporting period
Actor Categories Male Female Total
 
Authorities  
Civil Societies  
INGOs/UN agencies  
Sub Total      

Activity 2.1.3 Coordinate meetings between formal and informal authorities and service providers at county levels with representatives of community action groups (CAGs)

OUTPUT 2.2

Formal and informal authorities and service providers responsible for maintaining security and contributing to community resilience at the local- and state-levels, produce [and share], with communities, joint recommendations to support transparent, inclusive, and legitimate action on peace, security and community resilience.

Activity 2.2.1 Coordinate state level roundtables between formal and informal authorities, service providers and CSOs to identify and discuss key peace and security issues from the CSAs and state-level advocacy strategies (last day of each roundtable will be only for CSO partners)

Activity 2.2.3 Produce briefing paper with recommendations from state-level roundtables (Activity 2.2.1 above) to advocate for policy changes on peace and security at the state and national-levels

OUTCOME 3

CSO partners and other civil society actors, individually and collectively, plan, facilitate, and implement conflict- and gender-sensitive community security and peacebuilding programming in conjunction with other actors (including formal and informal authorities and service providers). They advocate on behalf of communities for transparent and accountable policies and services contributing to community resilience at the local, state, regional, and national levels.

OUTPUT 3.2

Civil society platforms at the state-level (new or existing) engage regularly with local and national actors (formal and informal authorities, state and non-state security providers, and other service providers) on conflict- and gender- sensitive and context-specific approaches to peace, security and community resilience, as well as raising the profile of key peace and security issues.

Activity 3.2.1 Establish (where non-existent) and strengthen (where existing) civil society platforms in each state

Activity 3.2.2 Coordinate meetings to bring community-level peace and security concerns to the state level (links to Activities 2.2.1 and 2.2.2) in order to raise those issues to the national-level

Activity 3.2.3 Hold national-level roundtables bringing together representatives from each of the state-level civil society platforms

OUTCOME 4

National and international actors (national authorities, donors, INGOs, and multi-laterals), listen to community-level peace and security priorities and start to integrate those priorities into national- and international-level policies, practices, and intervention strategies.

OUTPUT 4.1

Joint recommendations for more inclusive and effective peace and security provision drafted by CSWG, PCRC, and other community action group members, civil society organisations, academic institutions, national institutions, and international donors.

No because it was not within the quarter

1. YOUR REFLECTIONS ON THE OUTPUTS AND ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTED

Issues included:

Late transfer of fund

Logistical challenges due to limited motor car/bikes and absence of fuel from the state but programme people managed to walk to nearest communities to facilitate meetings.

The current market prices inflation affects activities forecast.

 Support needed included:

  • Logistical support to partner during implementation of activities this due to limited motor bikes/car in SARRA office.
  • Early transfer of activities forecast to partners

2. OUTCOME MONITORING

N/A because the CSWG did not implement any action point agreed due to commitment to domestic work

S/No What – tell us what they did differently because of our activities (not what activity you did) Who- tell us who acted differently, It could be a person, a group of people or an institution Where – tell us where or in which environment When – tell us the exact date this occurred or as near as you can get
1 State Relief and Rehabilitation commission (RRC) EES S, Torit requested CSWG to conduct assessment in Torit municipality Director general for Relief and Rehabilitation commission (RRC) Eastern Equatoria state-Torit. (John Odong Mayeriko )

 

·          Fodo-fodo,

·          Nyong,

·          Illangi and

·           Hawaii Messer (Ibalany)

 

 

07,March,2017

 

2
3  

 

4  

 

5  

 

3.    GENDER ISSUES AND CONSIDERATION

CAGs were having interest in attending monthly meetings particularly women’s. To said the truth the CSWGs particularly the existing ones learned to identify and prioritised their security concerns except the newly members. In terms of conducting meetings our CSWGs still need small support for them to conduct monthly meetings for themselves. in terms of   sharing the community concerns in the forums our CSWGs particularly existing ones were attending the forums and they always sharing their concerns with the informal and formal authorities and services providers and the only challenges was the authorities or services provider were slow in responding to community concerns.

Our CSWGs, CSOs and even general communities include religious leaders were really working hard advocating for peaceful co-existence in the state formal and encouraging informal authorities and services providers to response to some of the current security concerns e.g. cases of thieves, looting and harassment in the communities mostly by security providers. and other INGOs trying to awaking other people on peace building and conflict resolution.

Involvement of informal security providers (Monye-miji) working together in cooperation with formal security provider conducting patrol along the high ways leading villages to torit town for the safety of the local communities to move free.

4.    TECHNICAL SUPPORT AND CAPACITY BUILDING

Support receives from Safer world include:

Guiding in planning, budgeting and implementation of the activities

Support needed from Safer world include:

  •  Logistical support during implementation of activities
  • Sharing and amendment of draft of narrative report before file.
  • Provision of motor mike to PC for easy mobilization of communities.
  • Technical guidance on project implementation.
  • Availing all the copies of information from Safer world head office.
  • Providing high technical skills in term of project management experiences.

5.    HUMAN RESOURCES, OPERATIONS AND SECURITY

  • Limited human resources
  • Need assist project coordinator during activities implementations and in absent of project coordinator
  • Need to involve volunteers to help project coordinator at least to coordinate mobilization and write attendance since our CSWGs attend template is technical to use.
  • Continuing increase in the food commodities in the market and movement of people to neighbouring countries due to economic hardship could affect our monthly forecast and existing of our CSWG.

6.    LESSON LEARNED

  • High expectation by community for SARRA and Safer world to solve their economic hardship.
  • Due to high prices of food commodities in the markets i learn that only women were force to walk footing about 40km to 60km to the villages with children looking for food because it risky for men to move due to insecurity along ways outside towns.

7.CHALLENGES AND ACTIONS TAKEN

  • Limited Human resources on the project
  • Limited skills of other staff on the system of project but, we encouraging them to learn from field the field.
  • Logistical problem during implementation of activities
  • Non members of our CSWGs were attending meeting with high expectation for SARRA and safer world to solve their economic hardship but we are aware them on the scope of the our community security and peace programme
  • Continue increase in the prices of commodities in the market effect our monthly forecast but we were flexible enough to balances.

8. NEXT MONTH ACTIVITIES PLAN

List of activity planned for the next  month Support you need from the field office
OUTCOME 1: Selected communities and community action group members in South Sudan use their increased analysis, dialogue, and peacebuilding skills to identify, prioritise, analyse, and resolve local- and state-level peace and security concerns engage in reconciliation processes and support newer groups. They do this independently and collaboratively through established mechanisms (e.g., CSWGs, PCRCs, and peace committees).
OUTPUT 1.1
Funds
 
OUTPUT 1.2
 
 
OUTPUT 1.3  
 
 
OUTPUT 1.4  
Activities 1.4.1a Facilitate 4 CSWG monthly meetings in Illangi, Fodo- fodo, Nyong and Ibalany  
Activity 1.4.2

Facilitate dialogue within and between community and community leaders.

Funds
Facilitate one awareness raising meeting with community (youth, women, elders, religious leaders) and authorities on community security/policing 

 

Funds
OUTCOME 2: Formal and informal authorities and service providers, responsible for building peace and security and contributing to community resilience at the local- and state-levels, consult more with communities on peace and security issues, incorporate community concerns into their related responses, and operate to standards that are transparent, inclusive, and legitimate.
OUTPUT 2.1
OUTPUT 2.2
 
 
OUTCOME 3: CSO partners and other civil society actors, individually and collectively, plan, facilitate, and implement conflict- and gender-sensitive community security and peace building programming in conjunction with other actors (including formal and informal authorities and service providers). They advocate on behalf of communities for transparent and accountable policies and services contributing to community resilience at the local, state, regional, and national levels.
 
OUTCOME 4: National and international actors (national authorities, donors, INGOs, and multi-laterals), listen to community-level peace and security priorities and start to integrate those priorities into national- and international-level policies, practices, and intervention strategies.
OUTPUT 4.1
Activities NOT related with any of the Outcomes
Attending  monthly state and NGOs partners coordination meeting N/A
Attending monthly SGBV Monthly meeting N/A
Attending rule of law forum N/A
Attending peace cluster coordination meeting N/A
Attending  monthly state and NGOs partners coordination meeting N/A


 

 

April 22, 2017

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